How to Change Colors & Keep Straight Edges in Crochet

 

I decided to write this tutorial because I realized when I am writing my patterns I am always telling everyone to change colors during most patterns and have never shown you how! Well, now… The wait is over… YEAH!! 🙂 I’ve put together a step by step picture tutorial on what I think is the best way to change colors in crochet! It really is very simple and you will be left wondering why you never tried this before!

Kết quả hình ảnh cho HOW TO CHANGE COLORS IN CROCHET Change colors in Crochet with this free crochet tutorial from Rescued Paw Designs

Just scroll on down to find the easy way to change color in crochet tutorial

Change colors in Crochet with this free crochet tutorial from Rescued Paw Designs

STEP 1: When you are working a crochet project and are ready to change colors simply continue the last stitch, but before you yarn over for the last time stop using the current color you are working with and drop it. It was orange for me (see picture)

Learn How to Change Colors in Crochet From Rescued Paw

 

STEP 2: Grab your new color (blue for me) you are changing to and lay it on top of your crochet hook. Leave the previous color alone! 🙂

Learn How to Change Colors in Crochet From Rescued Paw

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STEP 3: Pull the blue through the two orange loops, turn your project, chain 1 (since I am using single crochets) you would chain two if working with double crochets or 3 if working with triple crochets

Learn How to Change Colors in Crochet From Rescued Paw

STEP 4: You have officially learned how to change colors in crochet! !! YEAH!! Continue working your pattern as stated.

Learn How to Change Colors in Crochet From Rescued Paw

Keeping straight edges in crochet is easier than you think. There are different methods to achieving nice and uniform edges, and it all depends on one little chain. Seriously.

Kết quả hình ảnh cho Keeping straight edges in crochet is easier than you think. There are different methods to achieving nice and uniform edges, and it all depends on one little chain. Seriously.

There are two generally followed methods of starting a new row in crochet, and which method you choose dictates how evenly (or unevenly) your edges will come out. Yes, it really is that simple and it’s all about the turning chain.
I personally do not ever count mine as a stitch, and none of my crochet patterns are written to count them. Even if I am crocheting a pattern from another designer and it calls for the turning chain to be counted, I typically make a slight alteration and crochet in the way that I feel it looks best.

I do what I want.

Counting (or not counting) the turning chain in crochet is all personal preference. I have found, however, that when I do not count the turning chain as a stitch, my edges are not as “holey” and my edge stitches stay much more uniform and orderly.

How to Avoid Gaps when Crocheting Edges

In short, my crocheted edges are straighter when I do not count the chain as a stitch. Instead, when you make your first stitch in each new row go into the very first stitch since the chain is not counted. When you get to the end, go into the last completely formed stitch. That’s it!

Crocheting Straight Edges without Gaps

Instead of doing a chain-3 for this double crochet and counting it as a chain, chain two instead and start in that very first stitch.

How to Eliminate Gaps in Crochet

How many you chain to start a new row in crochet depends on the height of the stitch you’re using.  If you are not counting the turning chain as a stitch, you will:

Chain 1 to start a single crochet row
Chain 1 to start a half double crochet row
Chain 2 to start a double crochet row
Chain 3 to start a treble crochet row
Chain 4 to start a quadruple crochet row
and so on

Need a great pattern to fine-tune your straight edge crochet skills? I highly recommend making a set of 4 – 6 of this washcloth pattern. If the sides aren’t exactly straight it won’t matter, and in the end you’ll have new and awesome dishcloths to use! 😉

Keeping straight edges in crochet really is as simple as this one little trick. If a pattern is not written in this manner you do not have to change it. If you wish to, however, many times it is as simple as recognizing the chain-3 for a double crochet stitch as opposed to a chain-2.  Not sure how to modify it? There are thousands of crocheters in the Heart Hook Home Crochet Community available to help!

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